STRENGTH TRAINING FOR RUNNERS – CRAIG COGGLE (PT)

I started working with Craig in October 2016 to get me in top shape ready for each season and with his help I have had successful seasons. He has written a blog for me about strength training to help others out.

So you are a runner and you want to go faster, you just need to do more running, right? To a certain point you would be correct, but what if you could increase the power that you exert into the floor to propel you along! Surely that would make you faster too?

There are many reasons for you to hit the weight rack with increased strength, increased power, injury prevention etc. etc. but let’s look at the key aspects of what you need to cover to get you moving faster:

  • Leg strength;
  • Gluteal Strength;
  • Core Stability; and
  • Explosiveness.

Using a mix of strength and ballistic/plyometric exercise will get you the results that you need.  Ballistic and plyometric exercises require a great deal of force to rapidly and repeatedly get you off the ground and reduce your foot contact time with the floor.

For a runner, strength training is important in order to increase the amount of force that the body can produce by increasing the stability of the joints, control of movement and importantly the strength of muscles.  This new found strength combined with plyometrics will make you a more powerful runner, force x speed = power.

Plyometrics is a very overused word within the training community, truly plyometric exercises would require a contact time with the floor of less than 0.2 seconds, anything more than this and the exercise would become a ballistic one.  For true speed development plyometrics would be your best route to get the firing mechanisms within the calf and Achilles to work at their full potential.  To put it basically if you pull an elastic band and fire it, it will cover a few feet, but if you pull it fully and fire it, it will travel faster for a much further distance.  This is what we are trying to achieve, so lets get a more powerful and faster you moving forwards…

The Programme –

2 sessions per week as well as your normal running training. These strength sessions will be built up of a combination of supersets and tri-sets to make your training time the most efficient possible (supersets and tri-sets is a fancy way of saying exercise’s put together without a rest)

3 sets of 8-10 reps of each sequence of exercises

Sequence 1 Sequence 2 Sequence 3
Squat Bulgarian split squats Bosu single leg balance
Ballistic Lunges Pogo (plyometric) A-Steps
Press ups (with a jump if possible) Bent over row Plank Rotation

 

Establishing the right weight would benefit you greatly but take it easy and don’t rush too much you should feel like you could perform 1 or 2 more reps at the end of every set if you feel like you could do another 10 its time to put that weight up!

The Squat is one of the most simple and best “compound” exercises for developing leg strength and core stability.  Some key aspects to performing this exercise would be to keep the core engaged, your chest lifted, upper back engaged with the bar pulled into your shoulders, and most importantly you need your hips to drop below the centre of the knee with the knees tracking over your toes. The reason for this is to protect your knees and the best hamstring and glute activation happens when you break parallel.

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With ballistic lunges be stable and be safe, slow them down really concentrating on landing and producing an upward explosive force for you to jump and change your feet.

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Press ups are great for improving upper body strength, but remember to hold that core in tight especially if you are making it ballistic. To make it ballistic you would exert a force to allow your hands to come off the floor and absorb the landing, if you wanted to get fancy you could always add a clap!

 

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The bulgarian split squat is great for single leg development, with your rear foot elevated on a bench you want to sink until your front leg achieves 90% angle at the knee by driving your back knee down towards the floor.

 

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Pogo’s are the easiest plyometric exercise to perform both feet together and flexed ,legs straight and you are looking to produce a jump by striking you forefoot off the floor with no upper leg help. If you feel like an idiot doing this o r struggle skipping would be a good alternative.

Bent over rows are great for the upper body, nice flat back parallel to the floor, soft knees and core engaged start to pull the barbell up your thighs towards your waist concentrating on squeezing your shoulder blades together.

 

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Bosu single leg balance, we are trying to increase the stability of your ankles with the bosu dome side up you will stand on top for as long as you can. If you are a balance ninja and find this really easy try moving the other leg around to challenge your balance.

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A-steps are a classic knee drive running drill to encourage an athlete to drive there knees higher whilst running and thus encouraging the cycle movement required for speed.

Plank Rotations are great for upper body strength and core stability. If you feel this in your back there is something wrong with your initial set up. I know people say you need to be straight in a plank which is true but its your skeleton that needs to be straight with a flat pelvis. Remember your bum is attached to the outside of your skeleton.

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And there it is your basic strength plan to get you running stronger and faster. For video guidance of this article please go along and have a look at my you tube channel where you will find Strength training for runners video covering everything we did in this article.

You Tube Craig ‘Coggles Fitness’ Coggle

Safe running guys!

Craig Coggle

Cogglesfitness@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

So you are a runner and you want to go faster, you just need to do more running, right? To a certain point you would be correct, but what if you could increase the power that you exert into the floor to propel you along! Surely that would make you faster too?

There are many reasons for you to hit the weight rack with increased strength, increased power, injury prevention etc. etc. but let’s look at the key aspects of what you need to cover to get you moving faster:

  • Leg strength;
  • Gluteal Strength;
  • Core Stability; and

Using a mix of strength and ballistic/plyometric exercise will get you the results that you need.  Ballistic and plyometric exercises require a great deal of force to rapidly and repeatedly get you off the ground and reduce your foot contact time with the floor.

For a runner, strength training is important in order to increase the amount of force that the body can produce by increasing the stability of the joints, control of movement and importantly the strength of muscles.  This new found strength combined with plyometrics will make you a more powerful runner, force x speed = power.

Plyometrics is a very overused word within the training community, truly plyometric exercises would require a contact time with the floor of less than 0.2 seconds, anything more than this and the exercise would become a ballistic one.  For true speed development plyometrics would be your best route to get the firing mechanisms within the calf and Achilles to work at their full potential.  To put it basically if you pull an elastic band and fire it, it will cover a few feet, but if you pull it fully and fire it, it will travel faster for a much further distance.  This is what we are trying to achieve, so lets get a more powerful and faster you moving forwards…

The Programme –

2 sessions per week as well as your normal running training. These strength sessions will be built up of a combination of supersets and tri-sets to make your training time the most efficient possible (supersets and tri-sets is a fancy way of saying exercise’s put together without a rest)

3 sets of 8-10 reps of each sequence of exercises

Sequence 1 Sequence 2 Sequence 3
Squat Bulgarian split squats Bosu single leg balance
Ballistic Lunges Pogo (plyometric) A-Steps
Press ups (with a jump if possible) Bent over row Plank Rotation

 

 

Establishing the right weight would benefit you greatly but take it easy and don’t rush too much you should feel like you could perform 1 or 2 more reps at the end of every set if you feel like you could do another 10 its time to put that weight up!

The Squat is one of the most simple and best “compound” exercises for developing leg strength and core stability.  Some key aspects to performing this exercise would be to keep the core engaged, your chest lifted, upper back engaged with the bar pulled into your shoulders, and most importantly you need your hips to drop below the centre of the knee with the knees tracking over your toes. The reason for this is to protect your knees and the best hamstring and glute activation happens when you break parallel.

 

 

 

 

With ballistic lunges be stable and be safe, slow them down really concentrating on landing and producing an upward explosive force for you to jump and change your feet.

Press ups are great for improving upper body strength, but remember to hold that core in tight especially if you are making it ballistic. To make it ballistic you would exert a force to allow your hands to come off the floor and absorb the landing, if you wanted to get fancy you could always add a clap!

 

 

 

 

 

The bulgarian split squat is great for single leg development, with your rear foot elevated on a bench you want to sink until your front leg achieves 90% angle at the knee by driving your back knee down towards the floor.

 

 

 

 

Pogo’s are the easiest plyometric exercise to perform both feet together and flexed ,legs straight and you are looking to produce a jump by striking you forefoot off the floor with no upper leg help. If you feel like an idiot doing this o r struggle skipping would be a good alternative.

Bent over rows are great for the upper body, nice flat back parallel to the floor, soft knees and core engaged start to pull the barbell up your thighs towards your waist concentrating on squeezing your shoulder blades together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bosu single leg balance, we are trying to increase the stability of your ankles with the bosu dome side up you will stand on top for as long as you can. If you are a balance ninja and find this really easy try moving the other leg around to challenge your balance.

A-steps are a classic knee drive running drill to encourage an athlete to drive there knees higher whilst running and thus encouraging the cycle movement required for speed.

Plank Rotations are great for upper body strength and core stability. If you feel this in your back there is something wrong with your initial set up. I know people say you need to be straight in a plank which is true but its your skeleton that needs to be straight with a flat pelvis. Remember your bum is attached to the outside of your skeleton.

And there it is your basic strength plan to get you running stronger and faster. For video guidance of this article please go along and have a look at my you tube channel where you will find Strength training for runners video covering everything we did in this article.

You Tube Craig ‘Coggles Fitness’ Coggle

Safe running guys!

Craig Coggle

Cogglesfitness@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

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